Heike Young Content Strategy Director & Program Management New data from the Shopper-First Retailing report reveals how Millennials and Gen Z, Gen X, and Boomers have distinct shopping preferences. If we can fight the urge to believe that each generation is so wildly unique, we could learn more about what they want and what’s coming next. As of now, there are four major generational demographics that economists have recognized as distinct markets: Baby Boomers, Gen X,  Gen Y (more popularly known as Millennials,) and Gen Z—each of which is unique in their perspectives on marketing tactics and purchasing preferences. But for now, one thing is sure: Gen Z will have a significant impact on both business and the world. Millennials are so omnivorous in their point-of-sales that as a generational demographic, they’re the most likely to make use of every avenue of purchasing available to them. The in-store experience is still imperative, but it needs to be integrated with digital to attract the right customers in the product discovery stage. In this sense, Gen Z consumers sharing brand content on social media can easily be considered unofficial brand ambassadors. Although 82, percent of Baby Boomers are on social media, they are still. Like Baby Boomers, Xers also rely on quality customer service for brand loyalty as they see store associates as people who can relate to them on a consumer level and relay the best options for their purchases without an upsell. Gen Xers check emails on a regular basis and are more likely to respond well to personalized offers based on their previous purchases. This suggests that brands with bold and consistent omnichannel engagement are likely to perform better among the Boomer demographic due to their suggested popularity. As of now, there are four major generational demographics that economists have recognized as distinct markets: Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y (more popularly known as Millennials,) and Gen … unlikely to use the platform as an influence on their shopping habits, and only 12 percent of Boomers say they look to friends and family for advice on their purchases. But consumer reasoning for why they buy at each of these channels differs –– by channel and by generation. However, Boomers are very comfortable browsing and shopping online with 85 percent of surveyed Boomers reporting that they research products on their web browsers. This comes as a shock when the spending power of this generation. Despite being inundated with digital content, Gen Z still prefers to shop in-store versus online, but they crave a store that can keep up with their tech more than anything. Of course, the social consumer experience is not only limited to shopping mall excursions but social media as well: 68 percent of Millennials admit to being strongly influenced by social media posts while 84 percent say user-generated content has at least some influence on what they buy. GIs (born between 1901 and 1926) Generation Z are the new wave of social media users. Because of this, there is little market research into their spending habits compared to those of Boomers and Millennials. The Baby Boomer’s aversion to browsing is understandable; with a greater amount of disposable income than all other generations, Baby Boomers also have the spending power to make purchases without necessarily hunting down for bargains in-store, which is a greater characteristic of Millennials and Gen Z. Technology, the internet and the growth of e-commerce and m-commerce have widely been blamed for killing high street stores, but is this a … 81% of Gen Z prefers to shop in stores, and 73% like to discover new products in stores, according to a new survey by A.T. Kearney. say user-generated content has at least some influence on what they buy. “Two-thirds say they’re comfortable shopping online but still prefer to shop in-store for the instant gratification of not having to wait for their orders to arrive,” says Spivey. Although 82 percent of Baby Boomers are on social media, they are still unlikely to use the platform as an influence on their shopping habits, and only 12 percent of Boomers say they look to friends and family for advice on their purchases. As Sara Spivey, CMO of Bazaarvoice, says, “Companies should encourage Gen Zers to share photos and videos with their purchases, create polls and contests on social media and, most importantly, listen and respond to their feedback.”. Online, retail sites should interact with and promote user-generated content to provide a seamless shopping experience across the average Gen Zer’s many juggled web devices.